Single Weight Line Art Tutorial

Single Weight Line Art Tutorial : Line art tutorial clip studio paint youtube

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Most famous for his post-impressionist paintings, Vincent van Gogh also produced over a thousand drawings. In this pen and pencil line drawing, ‘Cottages With a Woman Working in the Foreground’, we see the stylistic swirling of line in the trees and clouds that is so characteristic of his well-known paintings. Capturing the swirling of the trees and the movement of the clouds, van Gogh represents the light falling across the textured landscape with quick, confident mark-making.

This wire drawing exercise ‘using line to create space’ is completed by students within a 3D Art class, working over photographic portraits. Having a base image to work from (this could also be an earlier observational drawing) makes the process of transferring from two-dimensional to three-dimensional much easier.

Planar Analysis Drawing Activity: This can be a great introductory drawing exercise, especially if you are moving towards Cubism or abstracting scenes into geometric form. Wire can be cut and bent into shapes with pliers to create three-dimensional ‘drawings’, often resulting in a work filled with flowing, curved lines. These wire sculptures can be attached to a two-dimensional frame or a flat surface, hung in the air, or be left free-standing, changing in appearance as a viewer moves around the room. Due to their flexible nature, wire sculptures often move slightly in the wind, adding an extra interactive element to the work.

Blind Contour Drawing : A blind contour drawing contains lines that are drawn without ever looking at the piece of paper. This forces you to study a scene closely, observing every shape and edge with your eyes, as your hand mimics these on paper. The aim is not to produce a realistic artwork, but rather to strengthen the connection between eyes, hand and brain: a reminder that, when drawing, you must first learn to see.