Space In Art And Design

Space In Art And Design : Space texture by zy rg on deviantart

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Pop artist Andy Warhol is famous for his brightly coloured silkscreen artworks; however he was also a rampant drawer – often filling sketchbooks. He won many prizes for the drawings he produced in high school. The illustrations shown above – comprising of slightly smudged and blotchy black lines – have Warhol’s typical off-beat style. They were completed using a basic printmaking technique: pressing sheets of paper into a wet ink drawing, transferring the image to the second sheet.

Famous artist David Hockey has produced many line drawings – often portraits. He draws in silence, with precision and care, moving a black ink pen across the paper quickly. This portrait – a snapshot into Hockney’s life – is entitled ‘Eugene and Henry’.

A gesture drawing is completed quickly – often in short timed durations, such as 20, 30, 60 or 90 seconds – using fast, expressive lines. Gesture drawings capture basic forms and proportions – the emotion and essence of a subject – without focusing on detail. Due to their rapid completion, they are a great way to record movement and action, as well as increase your drawing speed, confidence and intuitive mark-making skill. Gesture drawings are best completed with smooth, easily applied mediums (chunky graphite pencils, charcoal sticks, pastels, soft brushes dipped in Indian ink, for example), without the use of an eraser. They are often completed on large, inexpensive sheets of paper, where you can move your arm fluidly, be bold with mark-making, and not worry about mistakes. As with blind drawings, gesture drawing is an ideal warm-up activity.

This wire drawing exercise ‘using line to create space’ is completed by students within a 3D Art class, working over photographic portraits. Having a base image to work from (this could also be an earlier observational drawing) makes the process of transferring from two-dimensional to three-dimensional much easier.